Flossmoor Tree Grant

We want to give you a free tree! The Village of Flossmoor is receiving trees for its parkway/public spaces through a grant awarded to the Student Conservation Association, provided by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). The purpose of the GLRI grant is to help reduce flooding in the Calumet region. A crew of local, young adults working for the SCA, and with the help of resident volunteers, will plant trees throughout Flossmoor parkways/public spaces starting in April 2019. In addition, the Morton Arboretum, Rain Ready and Davey Resource Group are collaborating to provide education and training opportunities for residents who wish to learn how to properly care for their trees.

GLRI grant trees are restricted to parkways but are available to Flossmoor residents on a first-come, first serve basis at no cost.  Most GLRI grant trees are ¾” to 1 ¼” diameter.  All residents are eligible to participate in the tree grant program and are encourages to attend the Morton Arboretum educational and training events, free of charge. The deadline to apply for the 2019 Flossmoor Tree Grant is March 18.

Apply for the 2019 Flossmoor Tree Grant here.

Available trees Botanical name Description
Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa Height: 70-80 feet, Spread: 70-80 feet, Form: irregular, round with dark gray to brown bark with deep furrows. Prefers moist, well-drained and dry soil with high alkaline content and full sun. Branches bear lustrous dark green leaves that turn yellow-brown in fall. Attracts game birds, game mammals, migrant birds and small mammals. Slow to moderate growth rate. (Read more.)
Blue Beech Carpinus caroliniana Height: 20-30 feet, Spread: 20-30 feet, Form: multi-stemmed and round. Prefers acidic, moist soils but tolerant to wet and well-drained soil. Leaves emerge reddish-purple, changing to dark green then yellow to orange-red in the fall. Attracts game birds, small mammals and songbirds. Slow growth rate. (Read more.)
Yellow Birch Betula alleghaniensis Height: 60-75 feet, Spread: 60-75 feet, Form: round with reddish brown to bronze bark marked with long, horizontal lenticels. Prefers moist, well-drained, slightly acidic soil and partial shade. Fall color is yellow. Attracts game birds, insect pollinators, small mammals and songbirds. Moderate growth rate. (Read more.)
Chinquapin Oak Quercus muehlenbergii Height: 50-80 feet, Spread: 50-70 feet, Form: pyramidal, round with ashy-gray flaky, scaly ridges and plates separated by shallow fissures. Prefers moist, well-drained alkaline soils but can tolerate drier soils. Glossy, coarsely-toothed, yellow-green leaves change to orange-brown to brown in fall. Attracts game birds, game mammals, migrant birds and small mammals. Slow to moderate growth rate. (Read more.)
Swamp White Oak Quercus bicolor Height: 50-60 feet, Spread: 50-60 feet, Form: broad, round with dark gray-brown bark with blocky ridges. Prefers moist, well-drained, slightly acidic soil and full sun. Two-toned leaves dark green on top with a silvery-white underside. Fall color is an orange-gold to yellow in mid-autumn. Attracts game birds, game mammals, migrant birds and small mammals. Moderate growth rate. (Read more.)
Pecan Carya illinoinensis Height: 70-100 feet, Spread: 40-75 feet, Form: oval with brownish-black bark turns scaly with age. Prefers moist, well-drained, sometimes wet soil. Full sun. Leaves are yellow-green and yellow in fall. Attracts cavity-nesting birds, game birds, small mammals, water birds and songbirds. Moderate growth rate. (Read more.)
Bitternut Hickory Carya cordiformis Height: 50-70 feet, Spread: 40-50 feet, Form: oval, round and upright with gray, green bark with tight narrow ridges. Prefers moist, well-drained and slightly acidic soil in partial shade and sunny areas. Leaves yellow-green with serrate margins, paler underneath. Fall color is yellow-brown. Attracts cavity-nesting birds, game birds, migrant birds, small mammals and songbirds. Slow growth rate. (Read more.)